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File: 1553593098921.jpg (115.06 KB, 850x478, maryhobson.jpg)

No. 391065

Society values the youth. Any time a young person does something does some considered exceptional for their age it's all over the media. Even online there are amazing artists that have only entered their teens. Seeing this can make anyone feel insecure about their age and what they've accomplished. I see it on here all the time, and it would be a lie if I said I didn't have those feelings.

Your potential doesn't diminish at the age of 25 and it certainly doesn't extinguish itself at the rip old age of 30. Use this thread to collect, document and discussion people that accomplished goal and/or became successful at a later age from what we see. When those exposes is asymmetrical toward those younger, it makes us feel it if you can't young it doesn't exist. Well, /that's not true/. We'll never get younger, only older. So, it's best we realise that /our life isn't over/ and we have decades left to live. Do something you enjoy and be proud of it. We can go it sisters.


First example is this BAD ASS, right here. Her name is Mary Hobson.
>She learned Russian at 56, as you felt she wouldn't be able to fully understand "War and Peace" if you didn't read it in Tolstoy's original text.
>When to Uni at 62
>Finished in PhD at 74
>In Russia is now considered one o the preeminent scholars of Pushkin.

https://www.rbth.com/arts/literature/2016/04/22/learning-russian-has-given-me-a-whole-new-life_587093

No. 391068

File: 1553593876201.gif (220.94 KB, 700x450, AnnLeckieAncillaryMercy.gif)

Sorry, for the spelling mistakes.

>Ann Leckie had her first novel published at 47. Said novel when on to win The Hugo, The Nebula, The Arthur. C. Clark AND BSFA Award.

No. 391070

>>391065
That is super impressive tbh, Russian is hard af and not to contradict the spirit of the thread but languages are one thing that really do get harder as you age. But life long learning is important, I take a Russian class with a bunch of older people and the teacher often mentions how it helps prevent dementia.

But anyway, great idea for a thread. I've mostly moved past my fear of aging and look forward to many years of learning new things, it's exciting to think about. My goal isn't so much success as having fulfilling hobbies, but either are possible for much longer than youngins on the internet seem to think.

No. 391074

>>391070
Thanks, with all the depression around these parts, this idea to post this thread had been percolating around my head for some months. It got retriggered, because of the quarter life crisis thread.

As Mary shows despite languages being perceived as harder when you age it's is NOT impossible. You just need interest and motivation. Also, tells me not to worry if I not a Polyglot by 30.

No. 391075

>>391070
Also, your way of thinks is very healthy. Being a success in what you love is of course fantastic, but it's myoptically focusing on it, so if it doesn't happen you're a shamed is a problem.

No. 391078

this thread is very wholesome.

No. 391079

I'm loving this thread already. I absolutely hate the consensus that once you turn 25 there's no point in trying to accomplish anything anymore, such as learning to play an instrument or learn a new language. Maybe it's not as easy as learning it while you're a toddler but it's far from impossible.

No. 391081

File: 1553597569980.jpg (67.47 KB, 415x594, Kathryn Joosten.jpg)

Kathryn Joosten

>Started acting career at after being a nurse

>Worked as a street performer at Disney at 53
>After years in Hollywood won an Emmy at 66.

RIP.

No. 391084

File: 1553598244341.jpg (864.79 KB, 3176x2644, Paul_Gauguin_109.jpg)

>Post-Impressionist Paul Gauguin started painting in his 40's after losing his job at a bank.

No. 391085

>>391079
I’m 26 and juuuuust starting on opening a store. The whole meme of having everything perfectly together in your twenties is depressing. It used to be normal to struggle through your twenties. Instagram is particularly bad for this imo.

No. 391092

File: 1553600727062.jpg (22.9 KB, 474x342, thWCM2A65H.jpg)

Christoph Waltz was already acting beforehand, but got his first american role at the age of 53. Just 3 years later he had won 2 Oscars.

Mads Mikkelsen only started acting at the age of 31.

No. 391094

File: 1553601206404.jpg (113.69 KB, 1024x903, GettyImages-850228016-1024x903…)

What a great idea thread! Unskilledworker on IG started painting at age 48 without formal training and you may have seen her work at Gucci. https://qz.com/591755/this-self-taught-artist-began-painting-at-age-48-and-rose-to-international-fame-just-a-year-later/

No. 391095

>>391092
Samefag, but I wanted to add this: most of the time learning languages really seem to be the key.
If Waltz wasn't so good at english, he might have never been offered those roles. Mikkelsen also speaks multiple languages, which allowed him to promote and star in movies in various countries.

No. 391121

>>391094
She reminds me of the former Vogue Editor-in-chief.

No. 391165

File: 1553621866875.jpg (160.87 KB, 604x388, Jip6Ino.jpg)

I love this thread idea. Here's a smaller scale one I really like.

Vashti Bunyan is a musician who released one album in the late 60s. It did very poorly, and she gave up on music for the next 30 years to raise her kids. Her unique sound and style gained a cult following over the years, eventually leading to a re-release of her first album and a blossoming music career in her late 60s, early 70s. It warms my heart.

No. 391200

>>391165
I love Vashti! Great example.
best song:

No. 391239

>>391165
>>391200
Aww, this is such a nice story.

No. 391243

>>391200
Ah, this song is so beautifully sad, makes me cry every time I think of it. Didn't know about story tho, good for her!

No. 391280

Meh this thread makes me depressed. Of course it‘s better than nothing but that‘s how I only see it, better than nothing.

No. 391287

>>391280
Why? People shouldn't stop growing just because they get older… There are a lot of setbacks in life and for some people it isn't possible for them to do this or that at a young age, even. It's inspiring.

No. 391314

>>391280
How is it "better than nothing"? It's your life. If you think you should wither up and die if you don't have a phd and make 6 figures a year by age 25 then you're literally throwing away like 40 years you could be doing something.

No. 391315

A bit OT but this is just a personal story.My great grandfather learned how to read and write when he was 76 and he would read me stories before bed and he was fascinated with learning new things. I think we're brain washed by society into thinking we're only good until we reach a certain age.It is true that as we get older our learning capacity diminishes but I think the fact that many people give up on their life when they're not even that old is also due to the misconception that we should have our shit together and be complete until a certain age which is ingrained in our brains by the society we live in.

No. 391380

>>391315
That's so cute anon, bless his soul. There's a certain maturity that comes with age, where you don't bother what others might think.

No. 391403

>>391315
Agreed. People's perceptions are so warped.

No. 391413

>>391315
OP here, discussion like this is encouraged. :)

No. 391417

File: 1553676176472.jpeg (53.73 KB, 730x547, BCCB44B4-9F5E-43E2-A8F4-59A2D6…)

Thank you to the anon that posted this

No. 391419

File: 1553677151013.gif (6.62 KB, 220x220, tenor.gif)

>>391417
This very much, I appreciate everyone contributing. Thank you, OP for starting this thread.
I wish I could add something but I only have famous examples of people achieving success later in life like Miguel de Cervantes.

No. 391504

>>391315
That's beautiful anon. Although much less impressive, my gran learnt to type for the first time when we gave her a laptop in her seventies, and she had a great time just looking all sorts of things up and messaging people on Facebook that she had lost track of decades before.
To me that was pretty cool, you can unlock new skills that lead to be social opportunities at any time in your life. Can't wait to see all you bitches on lolcow VR when I'm 90.

No. 391513

File: 1553706609630.jpg (21.4 KB, 200x333, 9780140431957.PE.0.m.jpg)

Published at age 63

No. 391523

File: 1553708242577.jpeg (65.51 KB, 435x580, 09B0B95B-0D0B-4342-BC15-EAC988…)

>Joy Magano
>Broke and divorced
>Invented self-wringing mop at 40yo
>Millionaire inventor by the year 2000

No. 391533

Actors who started out late:
>Christoph Waltz, got his first role at 51
>Alan Rickman, went into acting school (the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London, nonetheless) at 30, got his first big role at 46
>Naomi Watts, first big role at 31
>Alexander Skarsgard, first big role at 31
>Kristen Wiig, first big role at 32
>Jeremy Renner, first big role at 38
>Morgan Freeman, first big role at 52
>Samuel L Jackson, first big role at 45
>Harrison Ford, started acting at 33
>Jessica Chastain, started acting at 34

No. 391543

File: 1553711581789.jpg (8.14 MB, 2645x4000, Francisco_José_de_Goya_y_Lucie…)

For all the artists out there, Francisco Goya didn't get his first major portrait commission until he was 37.

No. 391545

>>391543
Thank you, anon! I didn't know that. I know that Van Gogh was 28 yo when he started to learn to paint which granted isn't old, but he wasn't a kid either.

No. 391547

>>391545
Goya did learn to draw and paint fairly early on but he was pretty much a relatively unknown artist for the longest time and I don't think he ever won a competition during his early years. Just goes to show that with art, it often takes time, effort, and persistence to be successful with it.

No. 391631

File: 1553728044281.jpeg (86.88 KB, 771x435, 336B65A7-BB44-4A9C-B13C-B925C9…)

I just watched some old episode of the real housewives of Beverly Hills and the women on the show literally talked about this. They said that their careers started in their 40s and that they finally have time and feel setteled down enough to partake in new projects. One of them said that she used to be a broke waitress in her 20s and another one said she was too busy raising children and is just now finally “living”.

The broke waitress is now a pop singer in her 40s, it really isn’t too late to do anything. I know this might not be as inspirational as the other examples in the thread, since these women’s have rich husbands that help them. However, it really made me feel at ease and hopeful to see women in their 40s/50s living their dreams and finding new hobbies.

No. 391634

>>391631
Piggy backing off of this, while I guess it’s not hugely inspirational, all the older women around me that I grew up with are now starting to really do things for themselves , I know plenty that have gone off to study or started small businesses. Personally for me success isn’t how much money you make but rather how content you are in your day to day life, and now that their children are all grown up these women all get to finally completely focus on themselves and what they want out of life. Even my mum is now running a small catering business which is decently popular, and it seems to be giving her a much needed sense of purpose and satisfaction with her life

No. 391651

>>391634
My mum didn't get into running a business or anything like that but now she's retired and her kids are grown up, her life is goals tbh. She's late 50s and spends all her time on her favorite things (running, swimming, biking, yoga, gym etc, she's a health nut) and she's always with her girl gang of other fitness freak women, they're always having coffee and traveling together and stuff. I can't wait until I'm her age and just spend all day doing things I love. I spend most of my time hanging out with my dad cause she's too busy for me kek but she deserves a long break after all the years she spent raising my sister and I.

No. 391652

>>391533
Christoph Waltz has been acting in German language productions since the 70s, Jessica Chastain has been a professional actress from the age of about 21 (although she graduated from juilliard at about 27), Alexander Skarsgard is a nepotism baby.

No. 391662

bandwagoning onto very small/local things, but seeing mature students always makes me smile! a year ago I met a 54 year old lady in one of my medsci classes who was on her way to become a midwife. also one of my coworker's wife, who is round 60 as well, just changed her career from teaching to food service (she has always wanted to do it and is in school for it!).

No. 391672

File: 1553741682375.jpg (289.1 KB, 720x518, yayoi-kusama-narcissus-garden-…)

Yayoi Kusama didn't show her work until she was 28, and even then she didn't really start showing or make work seriously until her early 30s. Louise Bourgeious had her first show at 32. Both are two of the most well known contemporary female artists of the 20th century. Marina Abramovich also didn't start until she was 27 and didn't do anything significant career wise until her early 30s.

No. 391784

Bless you for this thread OP, I'm 32 and feel like I'm too late to achieve something anymore.
All artists/actors/musicians/… are always so young or started young…

>>391085
26 is very young to start your own business, especially in our current society. Wishing you best of luck, anon!

No. 391998

>>391784
Older people doing awesome things and/or becoming great /need/ to be publicised more often. It's far too stewed to the young and for some creates unrealistic and pressurised expectations.

No. 392146

>>391998
This so much. It's as if your life is supposed to be perfectly in order once you reach 30. You're supposed to have your dream job, house, partner and don't you dare have any mental health issues or be depressed, those are only for younger people to have.

I want to go back to school to get a diploma in programming but my parents keep telling me I'm too old to "still" get into that and that 18 year olds will easily surpass me. I'm only 32, Am I supposed to do this non-fullfilling job for the rest of my life because I made some mistakes in my youth then?

No. 392147

>>392146
Go follow your dreams anon, let the next decades of your life be fruitful. If you have a lifespan of around 80. You have 50 years to go. Five long decades in which to get to any level you want to, you can get to those '18 year olds' level and beyond. You never know you maybe teaching those 18 years olds in the future. Let Mary inspire you and you in turn can inspire others. :)

No. 392148


No. 392149

I started learning programming when I was 25 and at 29 I'm doing it professionally and getting a pretty good salary, yet I still consider myself very young. I've had colleagues who started doing it in their mid 30's after changing careers. The thought that people should have their life figured out in their 20's is a fossilized remnant of the olden times when you didn't have much choice than to start working and establish a family when you're 25, now the world is open to many more options.

No. 392167

>>392149
Anon I just wanted to let you know how inspiration this is to me. I started learning programming at the same age, and now at the age of 28 I'm considering applying for some junior positions.
There's this strong feeling of being an impostor and not worthy enough but I truly love what I do. So, reading stuff like this makes me happy and motivates me to pursue my dream. I'm constantly going between, "I should do this" and "Why bother?"

I just worry I'll be stuck with some hip kids all fresh from high school and I'll be the old grandma with my memepad and arch linux. So, I'm screenshoting this as a daily reminder. Thanks again.

No. 392174

>>392167
AYRT and nah, a lot of programmers are 28+, I've barely ever seen people under 25 at my workplaces. I'm actually consistently one of the younger people in the project. It's great to hear you got inspired though, I'm always up for seeing more women take up programming no matter what age you are.

No. 392180

File: 1553866138740.jpg (18.97 KB, 387x429, gibhearts.jpg)

>>392174
I love you anon. You have no idea how much this means to me. I hope other anons that are aspiring to become programmers see your message too.

No. 392202

>>392149
>>392167
How the fuck did you guys start out? What books or materials did you read?

God I want to be you guys.

No. 392250

>>392167
>>392202
>>392174
seconding question about what materials you guys used.

No. 392256

>>391084
Thanks for this, anon. I'm going ahead with my painting plans, even if it takes time.

>>391280
There's also that people who burn bright when they're young can burn out soon too. Not everyone of course, but you have the 27 club, young musicians and actors who seemed to have it all dropping like flies from depression and drugs. It can be better to evolve slowly, unremarkably at first, and start on a career path you love when you're older and perhaps your psyche is more able to deal with the pressure that comes with unexpected fame.

No. 392261

>>391631
While I often feel the rich women in these shows dress ridiculously, the way people don't give a fuck when they age and wear whatever they want is actually not obnoxious on someone who takes care of themselves and puts some thought in the outfit. I'd rather see an older, fit woman in one of those shiny dresses than a bear bellied old man with his gut hanging out of a stained wifebeater, stinking of gave-up-on-life-years-ago.

>>392146
Keep your nose to the grindstone, anon. If you're in decently good health, 32 isn't too old for anything.

No. 392361

>>392202
>>392250
I don't know about the other anon, but I just learned to do things step by step using basic Google skills.

First I wanted to learn how to do a basic website with HTML and CSS, I think Codecademy still has free tutorials on that. Then I went on studying JavaScript and adding interactivity to sites. Then I went to study SQL, Python, and so on. But it also depends on what do you want to study now. There are so many paths you can take, devops, web development, sys admin, data analyst, machine learning etc. So, I can't give you a definite answer but here are some resources that may help you in figuring out:

A general foundation in programming:
https://github.com/ossu/computer-science

Web dev path:
https://github.com/kamranahmedse/developer-roadmap?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=6_awesome_css_extensions_for_vs_code_6_hot_vs_code_themes_of_2019&utm_term=2019-01-16

Codecademy: https://www.codecademy.com/
Freecodecamp: https://www.freecodecamp.org/

And lots of Udemy courses on various topics but when you're starting I think that there are Youtube tutorials on almost anything, like Traversy Media and Freecodecamp, so no need to pay for anything.

No. 393742

>>392147
>>392149
>>392261
thanks for the possitive motivation, guys!

No. 394254


No. 394736

File: 1554313436890.jpg (190.42 KB, 1242x1546, f8e6he1m41q21.jpg)

A man at 74 years old starts his cooking career

No. 394748

>>394736
You missed April Fool's by two days.

No. 394764

>>392256
>It can be better to evolve slowly, unremarkably at first, and start on a career path you love when you're older and perhaps your psyche is more able to deal with the pressure that comes with unexpected fame.

I love this so much and I definitely agree anon.

No. 394765

File: 1554317738364.jpg (131.88 KB, 1200x783, download (2).jpg)

Bob Ross started his painting career in his 40's, after serving 20 years in the military.

>>394736
Anon, that's Danny DeVito.

No. 394778

>>394765
>Anon, that's Danny Devito

He has conquered the acting world and now he will master the culinary world.

No. 394888

>>394765
This is an Extremely powerful post

No. 394925

>>394765
this post is so comfy

No. 399891


No. 399893

>>394765
I feel better now.

No. 400372

Alison Goldfrapp, at least by the music industry's standards. She was 33 when Goldfrapp got signed, 34 when their first album came out, and 36 when they got big.

No. 400826

I think that in a way, as we age some skills become easier to pick up.

Because we're mature, have more patience and can look at a problem from different angles and with more experience.

No. 401719

>>400372
Didn't know this.

No. 401806

>>400372
Goldfrapp is absolutely talented too, thanks for letting me know

No. 415448

OP here, hope their are female equivalents to this.

No. 475521

>>400826
God that's so true and sometimes I forget his. I dropped my childhood hobby of drawing for years in my teens/early 20s but finally gave it another shot at 25 and its actually much easier now because I have a better work ethic and don't mind grinding out studies and don't get hung up on everything needing to be as ~creative~ as possible.

No. 509044

Revising all thread rather than making another one hope that's ok mods.

Here's Dorothea Taylor doing a drum cover of "Down with the Sickness" by Disturbed! I fucking love this!
This is so encouraging especially when you see young music prodigies you can start at any age.

No. 509049

>>391417
I know this message was 10 months ago but I want to say thank you. I really appreciate it. My uncle just died of Cancer on Tuesday, the exact same type of cancer that took my Nan, around 2 1/2 years ago. Which means all of my family is at high risk of this cancer. Life truly is too short. Do what makes you happy and try not to compare yourself. Even if you achieve what you want at 40, at least you achieved that goal, rather than than wasting your 20 wondering why 'I'm not good enough now.'

>>391419
Famous examples are only encourage not dismissed!

No. 509050

>>391533
I really want to see more female actors, writers, directors and creatives of an older age.

No. 509073

>>509044
That was really wholesome. Good for her.

No. 509081

>>509044
To be fair, she was in drum corps in high school. There's another video on her channel where some of her old classmates are having a "reunion" video.

No. 509320

>>509081
Ah, I know that now. But it's still encouraging to see her get booked for jobs at her age.

No. 510082

This is a personal example, but I went to college and was in an honor society with this awesome lady who went back to school at age 50. She had taken years off to raise her kids, was working dead-end jobs, then had to raise two of her granddaughters as well. She went back to school to become a paralegal and was also voted vice president of the honor society. Now she's thriving in her career and seems really happy.

No. 510106

>>510082
I was ashamed for going to college in my early 20s but my friend who studies dentistry abroad told me she knows two medical students who are in their 30s (in Europe there's no pre-med so most of them finish in their 20s). One of them has a kid even.

No. 510196

>>510106
I don't get why people act like university is only for young people? Lots of people go back to school in their 30s and 40s and get degrees. College isn't just for 19 yr old frat boys. My ex boyfriend's mom became a nurse when she was like 40 and now she's a head nurse and makes tons of money.

No. 510214

>>510196
I grew up somewhere in Asia and it's a stigma if you're not a college graduate and have a stable job at 21-23 yet. Glad I managed to get out of that hellhole.

College dropout here and trying to unfuck myself that it's okay to go back studying when I'm finally pushing in my 30s.

No. 510220

>>510214
Oh yeah, different cultures have different norms. I was thinking of western culture when I said that. Also good luck! I'm 25 and hoping to go to a trade school later this year.

No. 510225

>>510196
It's not even necessarily for a career change or because they flopped in life prior to going back for a degree. My dad got two degrees for fun/out of interest while staying in his normal job until retirement.

No. 510226

I love the old lady in the photo,she looks so soft and precious.

No. 510234

>>510196

I think it's because people focus way too much on the "experience" of college than it actually a place where you go to learn something useful and grow the fuck up.

>>510106

I got into college when I was 20-21. There is absolutely nothing wrong with your decision. Get your degree for yourself and don't measure your life in the impossible terms of the world.

No. 510460

>>510196
Ayrt but basically everything what >>510214 said. As a freshman, I'm only surrounded by 17/18 year olds and when they ask how old I am they get shocked cause it's really not common here and they just assume I'm their age but when I tell them and see their reactions I end up feeling embarrassed.
>>510234
Thank you, anon. I'm trying not to give a fuck anymore.

No. 517281

File: 1582433577386.jpg (85.08 KB, 970x546, b27836dc-e145-4947-8d59-d3c601…)

Erika Jayne is almost 50 and a successful TV personality and pop singer. She didn't start her career until she was in her 40's. She's alsonstunning, at least IMO.

No. 539301

https://ukf.com/news/the-return-of-kemal/25765
Making music again at age 40 after over a decade of absence

No. 553614

File: 1589400399589.png (737.92 KB, 1100x3288, image.png)

This is a great thread. Growing up, I hardcore internalized the idea that you're an abject failure if you're not a top-of-the-field success story by your mid-20's, and it caused me to crash and burn as soon as I hit a professional rough patch.

It turns out that, if you're not an aspiring artist at least, that nobody in the professional world expects somebody in their mid 20's (or even mid-30's in many cases…) to know much of anything, so I wonder where this sentiment even comes from. Is it because young artistic talent and entrepreneurs are exalted in the media? Because higher SES parents put pressure on their kids to overperform? Because elders aren't valued in the West? Whatever the reason, it's setting youths up for failure. Even (especially?) on lolcow, some of the kids here seem to have bizzare beliefs about aging even over the most shallow, low-stakes shit like what types of clothes are too 'young' for 23-year-olds and I can't help but wonder how miserable they're going to be in a few years.

Blogpost aside, here are some contributions:
>Laura Ingalls Wilder, didn't start writing professionally until her 40's and published her first novel in her 60's
>Craig Venter, famous geneticist/biotech entrepreneur, only got a Bachelor's degree at the age of 26 after spending years as a low-motivation bum
>John Fenn, Chemist, published for the very first time at 32, a decade after leaving grad school, won a Nobel Prize in his 80's

Here's a positive study with respect to academia; onset of career didn't predict a scientist's level of impact or productivity.
> https://science.sciencemag.org/content/354/6312/aaf5239

Of course, age discrimination can be a hurdle when breaking into any new career.

No. 553623

I installed windows 10 on my own laptop three years ago


I didn’t think I could install an operating system but I did it!

No. 553696

>>553614
> so I wonder where this sentiment even comes from.
Most people pay about 100 times too much attention to what other people thing and what the society thinks.

No. 553699

>>553614
tbh, the insecurity for me mostly comes from people asking me what i do for a living, especially if they're older and/or do something impressive. i'm tired of giving vague answers or admitting to doing entry level unskilled stuff at my age and education level. i know i shouldn't care but i do.

No. 553704

>>553699
Yeah, social comparison is a bitch, especially when you get to an age where people on a more 'traditional' success timeline are really starting to come into your own.

There's a good chance that some of those older people you talk to didn't have a clean path to success, though. For example, I had a mentor who spent nearly a DECADE in undergrad because she didn't know what she wanted to do with her life and kept switching her field of study. You'd never know if you only knew what she had accomplished since finding the right path.

It seems to be increasingly harder to take linear steps to success as well; I don't know what your specific situation is, but chances are that many, if not most people your age are struggling to gain their footing too.

No. 557804

That's right goys, you too can wait until your 50s to start a career. Then you'll be famous just like all of these people in the thread.

No. 557856

>>557804
becoming famous isn't the point lmao

the point is that you can still succesfully learn new skills or archieve goals at a later age and that it's worth doing so. That you're never too old to learn and that it's not worthless just because you're not a child or a teen anymore.

No. 557889

My mum is in her 60s and has had to retire a few years early because of covid. She's talking about going to college and I really hope she does it.

No. 557907

>>517281
HAHAHA
I mean I’m a piece of shit but LOL. This probably was posted by one of the many mothers that actually shitpost on lolcow. Imagine being almost 50 and making songs like this https://youtu.be/3hL99eTKil8
Kim K tier desperation

No. 557989

>>553623
I'm proud of you! Congratulations!

No. 557990

>>557889
I'm rooting for her! I hope she does, too.

No. 558169

>>557907
I was thinking about that post but didn't say anything because I know Erika Jayne abandoned her son to pursue her "career" which is 100% funded by her rich old husband.

No. 616278

File: 1598483293034.jpg (317.58 KB, 999x562, b0cc168b869c407fa214d5c342097d…)

I'm guessing hardcore inspired by mature students going back into education and doing something they've always wanted to do. And I came across this really heartwarming story. Since he was a kid he wanted to go university, but because of poverty and the war he wasn't able to in his youth, but all these years he still had the drive to want to complete a degree and fulfill his dream. This year he graduated at the top of his class in Philosophy at the age of 96. I'm so happy for him!

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/world/2020/aug/05/realised-dream-italy-oldest-graduate-top-of-the-class-at-96

>>557889
Yes! It's never too late to retrain.

No. 616329

File: 1598489588418.gif (2.49 MB, 400x226, tenor.gif)

>>616278
wholesome

No. 616593

>>616278
ah bless him

No. 617626

File: 1598630034474.jpg (401.98 KB, 1000x1404, hugh-pindur-pindurski-wherenon…)

I get depressed from time to time and I'm clearly not the only one that worries about her age. I've tried to draw for many years now but have had many stop starts.
I was watching the 'Draughtsmen' podcast called "Can you be a pro artist over 30?"

And I was reading a comment from an artist called Hugh Pindur. He was telling his story where he drew but he took a 17-year break. He only started to draw again when he was 34. He would rise at 2:30 a.m. for 3-months to self study for around 5 hours before he was due to start work. After a few years he started to get jobs and during that time his work started to improve as well as his profile. And now at 43, he gets commissions from Wizards of the Coast.

I looked him up and I thought the artwork look very familiar and then to my surprise I found out he was one of the people that posted on concept art, before it closed down. He actually posted on my thread and basically encourage me to continue drawing and not give up essentially. Not only is he a fantastic artist, but he seems like a really nice guy too.

I thought I would just share his story in case you didn't know about it. I guess it's one thing hearing people acquiring highly competent skills after an average age, but I guess it's a bit different when you see/hear people doing it at such a high professional level like getting work from Wizards of the freaking coast.


>>553614
>Age Discrimination
Maybe the Arts are different, because people see your work before they see your age?

No. 617808

>>557856
Based reply, the other anon should be ashamed of herself

No. 617987

>>617626
I was trying to remember his name for the longest time, thank you anon! I've read an interview with him once and it's an amazing inspiration in the sea of people in their early 20s landing pro-level jobs nowadays.

No. 618028

From my personal life, I've seen a lot of women going back to college, doing masters and getting high-schools level certs so they can help their kids with homework. You can genuinely go back to learn something at any age and that's so inspiring to me.

No. 618041

>>617808
I think it's cheap bait now but who knows

No. 657694

Sorry for the almost-necro but this thread is always really soothing. Being 100% over the age where the brain stops developing now, I get kinda scared to be inable to change, both in character and in skills.

No. 657837

>>657694
anecdotal, but I actually made the largest jump in my artistic skills after my brain "finished developing". I finally felt secure enough with my sense of self to focus on what I really cared about. I feel like my younger days were spent chasing validation and acceptance while being afraid to really plant my roots anywhere. I started learning an instrument post 25 too now that I think about it. I won't become a prodigy, but most people won't. As long as you keep learning your brain will continue to produce the cells necessary - it might take longer than a child, but you've also got more discipline, drive, and honest passion, so maybe not.

No. 660090

>>617987
Seriously, when I found out it was the same artist that gave me a Pep talk and found out his age, I was completely SHOOK. Do you have a link to said interview? I'd LOVE to read it. :)

(I swear /ic/ would have you believe if you haven't made it by the ripe old age of 25 that you never going to make it in the industry. Like it's some Logan's run type shit.)

No. 660091

>>660090
Why do you even try to reply to things in ot? Are you that hurt it’s closed for a few days?

No. 660092

>>660091
Gosh sorry! Just saw the post. I'd wait.

No. 660562

>>660092
Came back here to say you’re a little bitch for lying and pretending you didn’t know ot was locked instead of just taking your L

No. 661489

>>657694
Is this actually true, or just something memed half to death?
I think it's just the point where you are very cognizant of having to actually study in order to learn. Also, being older we are much more critical of ourselves, then when we were kids. Feel free to post with an examples you find.

>>657837
But, like this Anon says, people over the age of 25 usually have determination and the sense of direction to do self directed study. This is commonly said about mature students and their work ethic. They can do so well in whatever path they choose to study in, whether it's for pleasure or whether it is to get a degree or to get a professional qualification or change career path.
Not all hope is lost.

>>660562
I have no idea why you are so aggressive and grudge-filled that you need to reply to this six days later. The thread wasn't locked and people can misread.

No. 661504

For all the anons worried about starting their studies late: I finished my bachelor at 30, with classmates who have kids already, and a student rep that was like 45. Some people had worked before and others had already several years of studies behind them in a field they realised they don't like. We all did great. I'm ready to bet you won't be the oldest there nor will you have the worst grades.

I also see people starting new hobbies in their 30's and 40's and either not giving a fuck about their skill level or actually doing really well. I take a beginner's language class, the average age is around 40 I'd say, and after a few lessons we can already joke around and have small convos in the language. All it takes is good group dynamics, fuck neuroplasticity. I also have a family member who's writing their second book at past 80.

I know it's petty but it makes me happy to see people proving the "you're done if you're not successful/settled at 25" schtick wrong.

No. 662246

>>661504
Reading this made me so happy good for you anon

No. 662252

>>661489
It isn’t aggressive to lightheartedly clown someone for lying about something that silly, all the threads around it were locked and they clearly sought that one out because it wasn’t. Dumb shit to lie about.

No. 663786

>>660562
Jeez, unlike you I don't sleep on here, and have had more serious matters to deal with in real life.

I don't know where you got such a massive chip on your shoulder.

No. 663789

>>557889

Trying to get my mum back into education, because she's always had problems with spelling and maths and I think it would really help and give her something to do.

No. 663793

>>391165
Diamond Day is stuck in my head. It's not my usual sort of music that I listen to, but it is quite relaxing and dreamy.

No. 663816

Came across this channel, when coming across ‘studytubers’ and mature student Youtube videos. This is really great encouragement to those that want a change of career, especially the medically field. Not all people get the opportunity to study medicine at undergrade. (Americans, Brits can learn medicine from age 18.) host of the channel is a graduate medical student that interviews current medical students to give advice and perspective to would be medical students. What really interested me is they are not the usual sort of student that transition from a science undergrad like Biomedical Science, but subjects like languages and photography! I’m glad to see that this is possible. I would have posted a link to a playlist but I couldn’t find one.

I was thinking of creating a Mature Student thread, but this thread is already small. However, it could be helpful. Hmm.

No. 663822

>>663816
*transitions

No. 663823

>>663786
>cannot take a joke

No. 663825

>>662252
Wow, you're also a mind-reader. I didn't see the main page, as that's not how I accessed the thread. (Separate tab.) Therefore, I didn't see threads were locked. It wasn't until I was cordially reminded by you, that I scrolled up and saw that I posted at the wrong time.

No. 663830

>>663825
Girl shut up

No. 663832

>>391095
Was Waltz famous in Germany, before his Hollywood Tarantino big break?

No. 663837

>>663830
I should be able to defend myself, against an untrue accusation. The thread has moved on now, and shall I.

No. 663840

>>663837
Anon literally said it was a joke you autist

No. 663844

>>415448
Related!

She seems lovely.

No. 663847

>>663837
it's cracking me up how you sound like a victorian era poet

No. 663848

>>663847
lol truly, it was an accident. I'm just trying to sound polite. Taking the high-road and all that.

No. 663849

>>663848
I appreciate you anon

No. 663850

>>509050
>>509050

THISX2000000. In Hollywood actresses are put out to pasture around age 40, let-a-lone breaking out as a star, like some of these older male stars are allowed to do.

No. 663855

>>663849
You too, bb. <3 Let this good vibes and comfy thread stay that way. (Be honest, this is the only thread I contribute to for that reason. Too many malcontents on here.)

No. 663889

>>510106
Going to college in your 20s is normal where I live. Usually when people make a big fuss about it, they're Americans, Russians or Asians. I started college at 22 because I was in a foreign country where I didn't speak the language, and going to the UK or Ireland was expensive and they don't grant visas easily to people from my country because everyone is trying to emigrate there.
There were some Russian girls in my class who kept calling me an "old woman" and telling me I'm not allowed to wear a miniskirt "at my age" and they were like… 17, even though a lot of other people in my class were even older.

No. 664100

I know everyone loves to shit on Jk Rowling right now and about how Harry Potter wasn’t that good, but it was a series for children and it meant a lot to me as a little kid. I didn’t carry that obsession into adulthood but I think it helped a lot of children in hopeless positions, the escape was important to me in second grade through sixth. Her growth and personal challenges are still very inspiring to me, and although she can be quite a cow at times (so many authors are lbr) I hate watching her get dogpiled because of her views on womanhood. It kind of scares me, like what are we eventually coming to? I don’t want to be a slave to other peoples delusions and roleplaying socially, kind of frightening to think about. Anyways end rant I’m just very thankful for how HP helped me as a child,

>>663855
You aren’t going to gatekeep threads, stop with the waaah I only come to this thread because you’re all meanies shit.

No. 667583

>>664100

It's only people with her level of money that CAN speak their mind. If anyone else did they would be fired and get tupperware full of shit mailed to them.

No. 668693

>>664100 "Views on womanhood" lmao. It's a scientific fact that everyone knows to be true, but is denying to remain employed. It's tyranny.

>>667583
And they have been… fired, harassed, physically assaulted. Normal non-rich women are the ones who have hit back and paid the price.

Rich, 'edgy' British male comedians, celeb scientists, journalists, etc whose whole shtick was they, and they alone, have the bravery to speak the troof… are now keeping quiet about the backlash on female sex based rights/science denialism to carry on making bank and remain popular on chat-show circuits lmao.

They are such fucking cowards. It's especially infuriating to me, as women are often smeared as morally-weak, social conformists, without much evidence. Why aren't these blokes getting called out?

Dawkins will go for suburban mothers and their tarot cards, but not delusional, bat-wielding raping troons. This is what he had to say…

"Is trans woman a woman? Purely semantic. If you define by chromosomes, no. If by self-identification, yes. I call her "she" out of courtesy."

No. 668696

>>668693
Bumping the thread to rant about celebs being cowards for wanting to keep their careers and not deal with the complete cyber-exile that comes with denying AGPs? Tbh I don’t blame any of them.



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